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Colombiana the “Irn Bru” of Colombia

I remember being a kid and you’d go to a party, and always be really disappointed when the kid whose party it was, had parents providing store brand cola, or soda. No matter how you dress it up, Safeway Cola was never a real Coke, but then as I got older I remember trying my first Irn Bru (great with vodka by the way), and then there were the golden years of Tango. Oh to reminisce as someone near 40….

After enjoying Irn Bru, and then finding out it was not only made from girders but was, in fact, the national drink of a country. Thus, I became obsessed with finding out what soft drinks existed in other parts of the world.

Generally speaking I have found that in fact Coca-Cola, Sprite, and Fanta, are not only by far the biggest in most countries, but generally speaking even if there is a bigger local drink, Coke simply just buy them out, but every so often, rare as it might be, you find a local gem, and in Colombia found that rarity Colombiana.

Colombiana is everywhere in Colombia, much more so than coke, and was founded in the early 1900’s as a Champagne Cola. A champagne Cola falls under the family of sweet sweet beverages that are common places in Latin America and the Caribbean that tend to be of orange persuasion and have a very unique taste. It was allegedly invented in Puerto Rico, from where it spread across the continent.

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Colombiana is one of the biggest of this strain of soft drinks, and no matter where you are in Colombia, you will find it. It’s a cultural phenomenon, with them sponsoring everything from sports teams and events to, well the places you would usually expect to see coke. To give you an idea of their size they sponsor the professional football league of Colombia.

So what does it taste like and can you mix it with liquor? (both equally important questions). It tastes great! In that, it tastes like a Colombian version of Irn-Bru if I am completely honest. If not a bit sweeter than its Scottish cousin (especially since the new laws in the UK make Irn Bru less sweet), and it’s super refreshing when served as it should be from a glass bottle.

Can you mix it with liquor? Of course! I have always been a fan of vodka-Irn-Bru, and with Colombiania it can be tied perfectly with some locally produced white rum.

Of course, there are lots of things you can try in Colombia, and Colombiana might not be number one on your list, but it should certainly make the top 5….

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